Mixed Martial Arts hopeful Arnold Allen could lose licence after drunken brawl at Christmas party

One of the world’s leading Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) prospects has been spared jail after he ‘ran amok’ at a Christmas party, assaulting the venue’s owner and six women.

 

The incident happened when a number of parties – including one for Specsavers’ staff and another with people dressed as Oompa Loompas – took place at All Manor of Events in Henley, near Ipswich, on the night of December 23 and 24.

The burgeoning career of professional fighter Arnold Allen, of Old Kirton Road, Trimley St Martin, now hangs in the balance after he pleaded guilty to affray, Ipswich Crown Court heard.

Allen is facing the possibility of having his licence taken away by his sport’s governing body.

He may also have a problem travelling to fight in the US due to his conviction, which could also cause issues with his training camps in Canada where he spends a number of months each year.

Arnold Allen in the ring. Picture: DOLLY CLEW/CAGE WARRIORS
Arnold Allen in the ring. Picture: DOLLY CLEW/CAGE WARRIORS

Sentencing the 23-year-old, Recorder Richard Christie QC acknowledged Allen, who was drunk, had originally stepped in to protect his girlfriend after she had been in an altercation with another woman.

However, the judge said: “After that you went wild.”

Allen was said by one witness to have been ‘windmilling’ his left arm about while having his right arm around his girlfriend.

While imposing a five-month prison term, suspended for 12 months, on Allen Recorder Christie told him: “You essentially ran amok.

Arnold Allen celebrating a win in Berlin in 2015. Picture: JOSH HEDGES/ZUFFA LLC/GETTY IMAGES                                                     Arnold Allen celebrating a win in Berlin in 2015.
“Part of your training is self-control and knowing when not to exert more force than is necessary, and that’s plainly something you have done on this occasion.

“Your whole career has been [put] on a knife-edge as a result of this.”

Previously prosecutor Michael Crimp said a series of parties were taking place at the venue, including an Oompa Lumpa party with some people dressed in character.

At around midnight a fight broke out. The origin of it was not clear.

Allen’s girlfriend had become involved. People intervened and Allen’s partner was taken to one side by a wall.

Mr Crimp said Allen later told police he believed his girlfriend was being manhandled and he went across due to his concern for her.

Andrew Hayward-Farmer, the owner of All Manor of Events, had been attempting to break up the original melee.

The court was told he already had occasion to speak to Allen earlier in the evening because of his poor behaviour.

After Mr Hayward-Farmer took Allen’s girlfriend to one side, the MMA fighter came up and punched him to the left-hand side of his face, causing him to fall to the floor.

Mr Hayward-Farmer got up and went towards a gate intending to close it, but Allen chased after him kicking his legs from under him.

Mr Hayward-Farmer landed on his back. Allen bent over him and delivered at least two punches to the owner.

As others came over to intervene Allen assaulted six women by punching and lashing out as he flailed away, the court heard.

Part of Mr Hayward-Farmer’s victim personal statement was read out in court.

In it he stated the incident had ruined Christmas for him as it happened on Christmas Eve.

It had also made Mr Hayward-Farmer uneasy about leaving his home, as well as having an impact on his wife – who was also present at the time.

Richard Conley, representing Allen, handed three references to the judge on his client’s behalf – including a ‘glowing’ one from a female Metropolitan Police inspector who trains with Allen.

Mr Conley said Allen was not used to alcohol as he abstains as part of his training regime.

Referring to his client’s consumption of alcohol that evening, the barrister told the court: “It had a marked affect on his behaviour, but more importantly a marked affect on his perceptions. It’s a matter of very deep regret that he’s before this court today.”

It was said Allen, who had no previous convictions, was genuinely remorseful and deeply ashamed.

Mr Conley added: “He’s gone into complete protection mode. He’s abandoned all other considerations. His only consideration was to come to the aid of his girlfriend.”

In addition to his suspended jail term Allen was ordered to pay a total of £3,250 compensation to his victims. He must also undertake 150 hours’ unpaid work and was made subject to a one-month home curfew from 9pm to 7am.

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

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Watch: Keanu Reeves’s hardcore gun and martial arts training for ‘John Wick 2’

KEANU REEVES REALLY GOT INTO CHARACTER TO PLAY AN EXPERT ASSASSIN IN JOHN WICK 2

The former Men’s Fitness cover star went through an extensive training period for the film, working on a tactical gun range with actual weapons, doing fight choreography with the stunt coordinator, and even getting behind the wheel to get comfortable with the film’s (many) driving stunts.

Reeves is not stranger to working hard on his training for film roles: Back when Reeves portrayed Neo in the Matrix trilogy, he went through months of martial arts training to prepare for that film’s extensive stunt work.

Reeves likely will be getting ready to do it all over again soon, as John Wick 3 appears to be on the fast track to production. Chad Stahelski, director of the second film, told Collider that the story is in the works, and The Hollywood Reporter confirmed that Derek Kolstad, who wrote the first two films, is back for the third installment.

Stahelski later gave another update to the Independent, saying that the third film could be a “completion” of Wick’s story and that the story will dive more into Wick’s backstory: “We are going to put in something about the High Table, how that all works,” Stahelski said. “We’re going to put in something about where John comes from, and where he wants to go. I don’t want to say too much more, but it will be a nice completion to Mr. Wick’s journey.” (Could that mean thatJohn Wick 3 will be the final film in the series? Time will tell, but it’s not likely as long as the reviews and box office scores are so good.)

Here’s a look at Reeves working on fight training for the film:

Reeves takes on tactical training for the movie in these two videos:

 

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Get moving with ancient Chinese martial art classes in Diggle

DISCOVER THE secrets of an ancient Chinese Martial Art right here in Saddleworth.

Tai Chi and Qigong classes are now open in Diggle and are held every Tuesday from 7.30pm to 8.30pm and on Fridays from 10.45am to 11.45am at Kilngreen Hall.

Katja Londa, a qualified Level 3 instructor, who runs the classes, first started Tai Chi 15 years ago after her first son was born.

A friend took her along to a class and she immediately took to the sport and has never looked back since.

Katja explained her favourite part of the classes is the calming effect it has on her and others in the midst of everyone’s stressful lives.

She added: “Everyone should give Tai Chi a chance as it is a sport for everyone, old and young. It’s a great way to get moving and unwind at the same time.

“The graceful, slow, circular movements require you to focus solely on what the body is doing in the present moment.

“Your mind slows down. You forget the stress you’ve just had at work or elsewhere.

“Tai Chi has been called ‘meditation in motion’ and that is exactly what it is for me. Switching off, while doing beautiful, flowing movements that have been done by generations of people for centuries.

“My classes have a friendly and relaxed atmosphere where I focus on each individual.”

The ancient Chinese Martial Art is used to help relax the mind and body, relieve stress, and improve posture, balance and coordination.

Tai Chi is also known to strengthen your immune system and is recommended by doctors to prevent falls.

Katja added: “It has been shown to be beneficial as an adjunct therapy for many, many health conditions including: arthritis, fall prevention, stress, cardiovascular disease, problems with the digestive system and impaired immune system.

“For this reason Tai Chi is now also being called ‘medication in motion’!”

New people are always welcome to Katja’s sessions and are encouraged to just turn up wearing comfortable clothes and shoes, with classes costing £4.50 each, and just £2.50 for your first class.

EDWARD R GARCIA

Amazing unseen footage reveals martial arts legend Bruce Lee’s only one ‘real’ fight in history caught on camera

Incredible footage restored by an avid Bruce Lee fan claims to show the legendary martial artist’s only competitive fight in history.

The clip – published for the first time yesterday – shows Lee dressed in black combat attire stood opposite his rival as they prepare to battle in front of a huge crowd.

“This is the only recording of Bruce Lee in a real MMA fight,” the video’s YouTube description reads.

“He’s fighting Ted Wong here, one of his top students.

“They are wearing protective gear because they were NOT ALLOWED to fight without them. Those were the state rules at the time.

“If not for those rules I can guarantee you that Bruce would have fought bare-knuckled. Footage is restored to 4K resolution. Enjoy.”

Spectators eagerly look on armed with cameras
Punches are thrown in the exciting face-off
Lee’s opponent hits the deck during the clip

Ted Wong was a martial arts practitioner who was best known for studying under Lee. He was born in Hong Kong in 1937 and died in 2010 aged 73.

In the video, Lee manages to keep his opponent just out of range with some nimble footwork before suddenly striking with a punch to the body.

Later in the clip, he counters another right-hook with a devastating two-punch combo to the chin.

Viewers were captivated by the rare clip, which has already racked up more than three million views since it was uploaded to YouTube on Sunday.

“Bruce is so calm in this fight but still wins – what a legend,” one user wrote.

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

Martial arts for PTSD

At least 15 percent of U.S. military servicemen and women suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.  Intense psychotherapy and medication are the traditional therapies. Now, researchers are studying the impact of one form of martial arts on veterans.
Jiu Jitsu is more than just combative martial arts for Army veteran Jacob King.
Jacob detailed, “I lost some friends oversees. That was really difficult for me to cope with.”
Jiu Jitsu is helping him battle PTSD.
 “Feeling in my chest, I’d get a headache, get a little dizzy. This is not normal. This isn’t right,” he said.
About 15 percent who served in Operation Iraqi freedom and Enduring Freedom have PTSD. Gulf War veterans: 12 percent and the Vietnam War: 15 percent.
“There really are no good therapies out there right now,” said Alison Willing, Ph.D, a professor at the University of South Florida’s Center of Aging and Brain Repair in Tampa, Florida.
Willing said costly intense therapy and medication has a low success rate. This is why she’s studying the effects of Jiu Jitsu on PTSD.
“The effects of this first study were so dramatic. The PTSD scores on all of the valid scales were getting so much better to the point where you don’t usually see with traditional PTSD therapies,” Willing said.
Jacob’s headaches and sleepless nights have pretty much gone away.
He said, “I feel good. I haven’t felt this way since before the military before Afghanistan, before everything. I feel okay.”
“The fact that we’re still engaged in these actions overseas means it’s only going to get worse,” said Willings.
A combative sport that may be Jacob’s best defense against the symptoms of PTSD.
“This is what’s holding me together right now,” he said.
Professor Willing said as the study continues they’ll have a better idea of how often the Jiu Jitsu will need to be done for veterans to feel the continued effects.

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

 

Small-town martial artist makes national team, has eye on Tokyo Olympics

Olympic gold is on the mind of a 23-year-old martial arts instructor.

With the 2020 Summer Olympics including karate for the first time, Ian Turner has the opportunity to join the first U.S. karate team, along with four of his students.

Ian, from the small town of Bailey, was selected to compete at the World Martial Arts Games for the United States Martial Arts Team in September. Participants at the competition will be chosen to represent the U.S. at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Ian, who graduated from William Carey University majoring in speech and social science, began training in karate at seven years old.

Martial arts inundated the pop culture of the ’80s and ’90s, with films like “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “Karate Kid” and movies featuring Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris. Ian laughed as he admitted that such movies made him interested in martial arts, and that he initially “just wanted to beat somebody up.”

His mentality quickly changed when he realized the intensity and beauty of martial arts at his first lesson. For the first seven years of his career, Ian trained for four to six hours a day for five days a week, taking four different classes a day.

As Ian’s love for martial arts grew, his family quickly joined him. His father, Kenneth, and younger sister, Brittany, began taking lessons. The two other Turner sisters, Kenna, 12, and Elise, 6, also take martial arts. Their mother, Sheila, does not practice but supports her husband and children at events and encourages them to master their forms.

Kenneth said martial arts became a “centerpiece” to the Turner family. They went to competitions together, trained together and Ian said they are each other’s “biggest competition.”

Brittany, 19, who started training at age 3, said she had never known anything other than martial arts.

“It’s the normal thing for our family; we are all close today because of it,” Brittany said.

At the age of 16, what Ian intended to be a small seminar to instruct other children in martial arts turned into him opening his own dojo. Turner Shotokan, in Collinsville, is run by the family with Kenneth, Ian and Brittany instructing.

“We do everything as a family,” Ian said.

At Turner Shotokan, Ian said they concentrate on teaching martial arts in an applicable way to students ranging from 6 to 40.

“I want to make sure my students get a good workout and are actually learning and are using what they learn so that they can defend themselves if needed,” Ian said.

On Feb. 25, wearing jeans and flip-flops, Ian and Brittany went to coach and encourage their trainees competing in U.S. Martial Arts Team tryouts. Next thing they knew, Ian and Brittany were given gis and convinced to try out.

“The game had changed,” Ian said.

Ten hours later, the duo were informed they had made the team, along with their trainees Thad and Logan Davis and Aaron Rhodes. Neither Turner sibling had trained for the tryouts because they were concentrating on helping their students make the team.

As part of the U.S. Martial Arts Team, Ian will participate in the World Martial Arts Games in September, along with his sisters and trainees. Ian spoke with humility and awe as he expressed the honor he felt as an athlete representing the U.S.

“It hits me every time I think about it like it’s the first time I heard the news. I am a United States athlete. I will be wearing the flag. Holy crap.”

Ian’s training for the World Martial Arts Games in Orlando consists of a strict diet and daily workouts lasting about five hours. He said this competition was the “biggest thing” he has ever done and he wants to be the best he can be.

Ian was chosen to participate in traditional kata, sparring, point fighting and continuous fighting at the games. Brittany will participate in Chinese weapons, point sparring, continuous sparring, jiu-jitsu and grapple strike.

“Martial arts isn’t just something physical, it is something mental as well,” Ian said. “Your body is only as strong as your mind will let it be. If you stop the second your body tells you, ‘This hurts,’ you will never get stronger physically.”

In the midst of his rigorous training, Ian holds on to what his father, Kenneth, has told him since he was a child: “Sacrifice a little now for a lot later.”

Ian is focused on winning gold at the World Martial Arts Games in the hopes of proceeding to Tokyo for the 2020 Olympics.

To compete in the World Martial Arts Games, the five Mississippi athletes are raising $4,000 for tournament and travel expenses. Those interested in sponsoring may contact Ian at ianturner15@yahoo.com.

 

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

 

One-third of world now overweight, with US leading the way

 

More than 2 billion adults and children globally are overweight or obese and suffer health problems because of their weight, a new study reports.

This equates to one-third of the world’s population carrying excess weight, fueled by urbanization, poor diets and reduced physical activity.
The United States has the greatest percentage of obese children and young adults, at 13%, while Egypt led in terms of adult obesity, with almost 35%, among the 195 countries and territories included in the study.
While 2.2 billion people were obese or overweight in 2015, more than 710 million of them were classed as obese, with 5% of all children and 12% of adults fitting into this category.
An increasing number globally are dying from health problems linked to being overweight, such as cardiovascular disease, said the study, published Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Almost 40% of the 4 million dying as a result of their higher body mass index were not yet obese, highlighting that deaths are occurring almost as often in those considered overweight as those considered obese.
Body mass index is the ratio between a person’s weight and height; a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is considered overweight, while anything over 30 is obese.
“People who shrug off weight gain do so at their own risk — risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and other life-threatening conditions,” said Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, who worked on the study.
“Those half-serious New Year’s resolutions to lose weight should become year-round commitments to lose weight and prevent future weight gain,” he said in a statement.

The global obesity picture

The researchers analyzed data from 68.5 million people between 1980 and 2015 to explore trends as well as figures regarding overweight and obesity rates.
Data were obtained from the most recent Global Burden of Disease study, which explores all major diseases, conditions and injuries globally by age, sex and population.
The data revealed that the number of people affected by obesity has doubled since 1980 in 73 countries, and continued to rise across most other countries included in the analysis.
Obesity levels were higher among women than men across all age groups, which correlates with previous findings on obesity.
Percentages of children who were obese were lower than adults, but the rate at which their numbers have increased was greater, signifying more risk in the future if nothing is done to curb the problem.
In terms of numbers, the large population sizes of China and India meant they had the highest numbers of obese children, with 15.3 million and 14.4 million, respectively.
Despite a smaller population, the United States had the greatest number of obese adults, with 79.4 million (35% of the population), followed by China with 57.3 million.
The lowest obesity rates were seen in Bangladesh and Vietnam, at 1%.
“This re-emphasizes what we already know about the obesity epidemic,” said Goodarz Danaei, assistant professor or global health at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “But it raises the alarm that we may be facing a wave of obesity in the coming years across high and low income countries.”
Danaei believes that while the epidemic may have plateaued in terms of growth among certain adult populations, such as the US population, the greater rate of change among children means there will be a future cohort of people who have been exposed to a high BMI for a longer period of time, which researchers will not have faced before.
“We don’t really know what the long-term effects will be if exposed to high BMI over 20, 30, 40 years,” said Danaei, who was not involved in the study. “It may be larger than we have already seen.”

A rise and fall in numbers affected by disease

In addition to highlighting the scale of the global obesity epidemic, the researchers hope to raise awareness of the diseases linked to being overweight that can prove fatal.
Almost 70% of deaths related to an elevated BMI in the analysis were due to cardiovascular disease, killing 2.7 million people in 2015, with diabetes being the second leading cause of death.
However, in more recent years, while rates of cardiovascular disease have risen, the number of deaths have fallen. The researchers believe this may in large part be due to better clinical interventions becoming available, such as measures to control high blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels, which all fuel heart disease.
Children of obese parents at risk of developmental delays, says study
Children of obese parents at risk of developmental delays, says study
This is the case in countries like the United States, argues Danaei, adding that prevention services leading up to the onset of cardiovascular disease, such as blood sugar monitoring, or care after a heart attack, or stroke, have improved in developed countries.
But these service are expensive and are not currently the norm in most low- and middle-income countries. “After a heart attack, the chance of dying is much higher in developing countries,” he said.

Why is this happening?

Obesity levels have risen in all countries, irrespective of their income level, meaning the issue is not simply down to wealth, the authors say in the paper.
“Changes in the food environment and food systems are probably major drivers,” they write. “Increased availability, accessibility, and affordability of energy dense foods, along with intense marketing of such foods, could explain excess energy intake and weight gain among different populations.”
They add that reduced levels and opportunities for physical activity that came with increased urbanization are also potential causes, but add that these are “unlikely to be major contributors.”
“Over the past decade, numerous interventions have been evaluated, but very little evidence exists about their long-term effectiveness,” said Dr. Ashkan Afshin, assistant professor of global health at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, who led the research.
“Over the next 10 years, we will work closely with the (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) in monitoring and evaluating the progress of countries in controlling overweight and obesity,” he said, adding that his team will share data and findings with scientists, policymakers and other stakeholders seeking evidence-based strategies to address this problem.
“We need to control the consequences of obesity much better globally … and help people who are obese to lose weight,” Danaei said. “That’s where we need research and public health interventions.”

EDWARD R GARCIA

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