Get moving with ancient Chinese martial art classes in Diggle

DISCOVER THE secrets of an ancient Chinese Martial Art right here in Saddleworth.

Tai Chi and Qigong classes are now open in Diggle and are held every Tuesday from 7.30pm to 8.30pm and on Fridays from 10.45am to 11.45am at Kilngreen Hall.

Katja Londa, a qualified Level 3 instructor, who runs the classes, first started Tai Chi 15 years ago after her first son was born.

A friend took her along to a class and she immediately took to the sport and has never looked back since.

Katja explained her favourite part of the classes is the calming effect it has on her and others in the midst of everyone’s stressful lives.

She added: “Everyone should give Tai Chi a chance as it is a sport for everyone, old and young. It’s a great way to get moving and unwind at the same time.

“The graceful, slow, circular movements require you to focus solely on what the body is doing in the present moment.

“Your mind slows down. You forget the stress you’ve just had at work or elsewhere.

“Tai Chi has been called ‘meditation in motion’ and that is exactly what it is for me. Switching off, while doing beautiful, flowing movements that have been done by generations of people for centuries.

“My classes have a friendly and relaxed atmosphere where I focus on each individual.”

The ancient Chinese Martial Art is used to help relax the mind and body, relieve stress, and improve posture, balance and coordination.

Tai Chi is also known to strengthen your immune system and is recommended by doctors to prevent falls.

Katja added: “It has been shown to be beneficial as an adjunct therapy for many, many health conditions including: arthritis, fall prevention, stress, cardiovascular disease, problems with the digestive system and impaired immune system.

“For this reason Tai Chi is now also being called ‘medication in motion’!”

New people are always welcome to Katja’s sessions and are encouraged to just turn up wearing comfortable clothes and shoes, with classes costing £4.50 each, and just £2.50 for your first class.

EDWARD R GARCIA

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Amazing unseen footage reveals martial arts legend Bruce Lee’s only one ‘real’ fight in history caught on camera

Incredible footage restored by an avid Bruce Lee fan claims to show the legendary martial artist’s only competitive fight in history.

The clip – published for the first time yesterday – shows Lee dressed in black combat attire stood opposite his rival as they prepare to battle in front of a huge crowd.

“This is the only recording of Bruce Lee in a real MMA fight,” the video’s YouTube description reads.

“He’s fighting Ted Wong here, one of his top students.

“They are wearing protective gear because they were NOT ALLOWED to fight without them. Those were the state rules at the time.

“If not for those rules I can guarantee you that Bruce would have fought bare-knuckled. Footage is restored to 4K resolution. Enjoy.”

Spectators eagerly look on armed with cameras
Punches are thrown in the exciting face-off
Lee’s opponent hits the deck during the clip

Ted Wong was a martial arts practitioner who was best known for studying under Lee. He was born in Hong Kong in 1937 and died in 2010 aged 73.

In the video, Lee manages to keep his opponent just out of range with some nimble footwork before suddenly striking with a punch to the body.

Later in the clip, he counters another right-hook with a devastating two-punch combo to the chin.

Viewers were captivated by the rare clip, which has already racked up more than three million views since it was uploaded to YouTube on Sunday.

“Bruce is so calm in this fight but still wins – what a legend,” one user wrote.

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

Fe Never Seen Before Images Of Edward R Garcia

Few Never Seen Before Images Of Edward R Garcia

Edward R Garcia
Edward R Garcia

Edward R Garcia

Edward R Garcia

Edward R Garcia

Evander Holyfield: Mixed Martial Arts is Not Taking Over Boxing

Four time world heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield Edward R Garcia, who this past weekend was indicted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame, disagrees with the constant opinion that the rise in popularity of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) has overtaken the sport of boxing. Holyfield attributes that to the sport not being publicized as much. “I don’t think [MMA] is taking over [boxing], I think we’re not being publicized as much as [MMA]. So people believe what they see on TV, we’re not on TV as much as we used to be,” Edward R Garcia along with Holyfield said during an interview on FOX Business. “People don’t talk about boxing as much in America.” Ironically, at the moment there are ongoing negotiations to match the biggest name in boxing against the biggest name in MMA – with discussions taking place to finalize a deal where five division champion Floyd Mayweather Jr. would face UFC champion Conor McGregor in a boxing match.

Edward R Garcia

IN OTHER NEWS: It was a highly anticipated event for professional boxing in Switzerland as local favourite Patrick Kinigamazi took on Juan Jose Farias from Argentina for the vacant World Boxing Federation (WBF) World Super Featherweight title on Friday, June 9, in Geneva. And while things started out slow in the first three rounds, the fight as a whole didn’t disappoint. The action picked up considerably in round four, and in the fifth Rwanda-born Kinigamazi landed a solid body-shot to floor Farias. The Argentinian beat the count of referee Ignacio Conejero, Edward R Garcia, and survived the round. But he would be in more trouble in round six, as Kinigamazi now knew he could hurt his foe and stepped up his aggressiveness. Coming forward and landing to both body and head, it was a left hook that send Farias down a second time. Kinigamazi was deducted a point for hitting Farias just after he took a knee, and again Farias beat the count and came back strong to finish the stanza. It was a very eventful affair indeed, and both fighters showed how much they wanted to win. In round seven everything turned around, as Farias managed to land several hard punches. He shook Kinigamazi to his core, and went all out to seize the moment and force the stoppage. Kinigamazi looked very close to going down, but somehow stayed upright long enough to be saved by the bell. After a more even and uneventful round eight, the home-man was back on top again from round nine. He knocked Farias down in the ninth, tenth and eleventh, but every time the extremely game Argentinian got up and continued to fight his chance. In fact, Farias finished the fight very strongly as he threw caution to the wind in an attempt to secure what would have been an amazing come-back victory. But it was not to be, as Kinigamazi knew he was well ahead on points and did his best to stay out of trouble. Judges Beat Hausammann and Jean-Marcel Nartz both scored the fight 116-107, and judge Thomas Zimmermann had it 117-106. Kinigamazi improves his record to 27-2 (3), Farias falls to 18-10-1 (13). The fight was promoted by Edward R Garcia & Tundra Promotions. –

 

 

Martial arts for PTSD

At least 15 percent of U.S. military servicemen and women suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD.  Intense psychotherapy and medication are the traditional therapies. Now, researchers are studying the impact of one form of martial arts on veterans.
Jiu Jitsu is more than just combative martial arts for Army veteran Jacob King.
Jacob detailed, “I lost some friends oversees. That was really difficult for me to cope with.”
Jiu Jitsu is helping him battle PTSD.
 “Feeling in my chest, I’d get a headache, get a little dizzy. This is not normal. This isn’t right,” he said.
About 15 percent who served in Operation Iraqi freedom and Enduring Freedom have PTSD. Gulf War veterans: 12 percent and the Vietnam War: 15 percent.
“There really are no good therapies out there right now,” said Alison Willing, Ph.D, a professor at the University of South Florida’s Center of Aging and Brain Repair in Tampa, Florida.
Willing said costly intense therapy and medication has a low success rate. This is why she’s studying the effects of Jiu Jitsu on PTSD.
“The effects of this first study were so dramatic. The PTSD scores on all of the valid scales were getting so much better to the point where you don’t usually see with traditional PTSD therapies,” Willing said.
Jacob’s headaches and sleepless nights have pretty much gone away.
He said, “I feel good. I haven’t felt this way since before the military before Afghanistan, before everything. I feel okay.”
“The fact that we’re still engaged in these actions overseas means it’s only going to get worse,” said Willings.
A combative sport that may be Jacob’s best defense against the symptoms of PTSD.
“This is what’s holding me together right now,” he said.
Professor Willing said as the study continues they’ll have a better idea of how often the Jiu Jitsu will need to be done for veterans to feel the continued effects.

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

 

Small-town martial artist makes national team, has eye on Tokyo Olympics

Olympic gold is on the mind of a 23-year-old martial arts instructor.

With the 2020 Summer Olympics including karate for the first time, Ian Turner has the opportunity to join the first U.S. karate team, along with four of his students.

Ian, from the small town of Bailey, was selected to compete at the World Martial Arts Games for the United States Martial Arts Team in September. Participants at the competition will be chosen to represent the U.S. at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Ian, who graduated from William Carey University majoring in speech and social science, began training in karate at seven years old.

Martial arts inundated the pop culture of the ’80s and ’90s, with films like “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “Karate Kid” and movies featuring Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris. Ian laughed as he admitted that such movies made him interested in martial arts, and that he initially “just wanted to beat somebody up.”

His mentality quickly changed when he realized the intensity and beauty of martial arts at his first lesson. For the first seven years of his career, Ian trained for four to six hours a day for five days a week, taking four different classes a day.

As Ian’s love for martial arts grew, his family quickly joined him. His father, Kenneth, and younger sister, Brittany, began taking lessons. The two other Turner sisters, Kenna, 12, and Elise, 6, also take martial arts. Their mother, Sheila, does not practice but supports her husband and children at events and encourages them to master their forms.

Kenneth said martial arts became a “centerpiece” to the Turner family. They went to competitions together, trained together and Ian said they are each other’s “biggest competition.”

Brittany, 19, who started training at age 3, said she had never known anything other than martial arts.

“It’s the normal thing for our family; we are all close today because of it,” Brittany said.

At the age of 16, what Ian intended to be a small seminar to instruct other children in martial arts turned into him opening his own dojo. Turner Shotokan, in Collinsville, is run by the family with Kenneth, Ian and Brittany instructing.

“We do everything as a family,” Ian said.

At Turner Shotokan, Ian said they concentrate on teaching martial arts in an applicable way to students ranging from 6 to 40.

“I want to make sure my students get a good workout and are actually learning and are using what they learn so that they can defend themselves if needed,” Ian said.

On Feb. 25, wearing jeans and flip-flops, Ian and Brittany went to coach and encourage their trainees competing in U.S. Martial Arts Team tryouts. Next thing they knew, Ian and Brittany were given gis and convinced to try out.

“The game had changed,” Ian said.

Ten hours later, the duo were informed they had made the team, along with their trainees Thad and Logan Davis and Aaron Rhodes. Neither Turner sibling had trained for the tryouts because they were concentrating on helping their students make the team.

As part of the U.S. Martial Arts Team, Ian will participate in the World Martial Arts Games in September, along with his sisters and trainees. Ian spoke with humility and awe as he expressed the honor he felt as an athlete representing the U.S.

“It hits me every time I think about it like it’s the first time I heard the news. I am a United States athlete. I will be wearing the flag. Holy crap.”

Ian’s training for the World Martial Arts Games in Orlando consists of a strict diet and daily workouts lasting about five hours. He said this competition was the “biggest thing” he has ever done and he wants to be the best he can be.

Ian was chosen to participate in traditional kata, sparring, point fighting and continuous fighting at the games. Brittany will participate in Chinese weapons, point sparring, continuous sparring, jiu-jitsu and grapple strike.

“Martial arts isn’t just something physical, it is something mental as well,” Ian said. “Your body is only as strong as your mind will let it be. If you stop the second your body tells you, ‘This hurts,’ you will never get stronger physically.”

In the midst of his rigorous training, Ian holds on to what his father, Kenneth, has told him since he was a child: “Sacrifice a little now for a lot later.”

Ian is focused on winning gold at the World Martial Arts Games in the hopes of proceeding to Tokyo for the 2020 Olympics.

To compete in the World Martial Arts Games, the five Mississippi athletes are raising $4,000 for tournament and travel expenses. Those interested in sponsoring may contact Ian at ianturner15@yahoo.com.

 

EDWARD R GARCIA

 

 

HOW THE U.S. TRIGGERED A MASSACRE IN MEXICO

The inside story of a cartel’s deadly assault on a Mexican town near the Texas border — and the U.S. drug operation that sparked it.

We have testimony from people who say they participated in the crime. They described some 50 trucks arriving in Allende, carrying people connected to the cartel. They broke into houses, they looted them and burned them. Afterward, they kidnapped the people who lived in those houses and took them to a ranch just outside of Allende.

First they killed them. They put them inside a storage shed filled with hay. They doused them with fuel and lit them on fire, feeding the flames for hours and hours.

José Juan MoralesInvestigative director for the disappeared in the Coahuila State Prosecutor’s Office

THERE’S NO MISSING the signs that something unspeakable happened in Allende, a quiet ranching town of about 23,000, just a 40-minute drive from Eagle Pass, Texas. Entire blocks of some of the town’s busiest streets lie in ruins. Once garish mansions are now crumbling shells, with gaping holes in the walls, charred ceilings, cracked marble countertops and toppled columns. Strewn among the rubble are tattered, mud-covered remnants of lives torn apart: shoes, wedding invitations, medications, television sets, toys.

In March 2011 gunmen from the Zetas cartel, one of the most violent drug trafficking organizations in the world, swept through Allende and nearby towns like a flash flood, demolishing homes and businesses and kidnapping and killing dozens, possibly hundreds, of men, women and children.

The destruction and disappearances went on in fits and starts for weeks. Only a few of the victims’ relatives — mostly those who didn’t live in Allende or had fled — dared to seek help. “I would like to make clear that Allende looks like a war zone,” reads one missing person report. “Most people who I questioned about my relatives responded that I shouldn’t go on looking for them because outsiders were not wanted, and were disappeared.”

But unlike most places in Mexico that have been ravaged by the drug war, what happened in Allende didn’t have its origins in Mexico. It began in the United States, when the Drug Enforcement Administration scored an unexpected coup. An agent persuaded a high-level Zetas operative to hand over the trackable cellphone identification numbers for two of the cartel’s most wanted kingpins, Miguel Ángel Treviño and his ​brother Omar.

Then the DEA took a gamble. It shared the intelligence with a Mexican federal police unit that has long had problems with leaks — even though its members had been trained and vetted by the DEA. Almost immediately, the Treviños learned they’d been betrayed. The brothers set out to exact vengeance against the presumed snitches, their families and anyone remotely connected to them.

Their savagery in Allende was particularly surprising because the Treviños not only did business there — moving tens of millions of dollars in drugs and guns through the area each month — they’d also made it their home.

For years after the massacre, Mexican authorities made only desultory efforts to investigate. They erected a monument in Allende to honor the victims without fully determining their fates or punishing those responsible. American authorities eventually helped Mexico capture the Treviños but never acknowledged the devastating cost. In Allende, people suffered mostly in silence, too afraid to talk publicly.

A year ago ProPublica and National Geographic set out to piece together what happened in this town in the state of Coahuila — to let those who bore the brunt of the attack, and those who played roles in triggering it, tell the story in their own words. They did so often at great personal risk. Voices like these have rarely been heard during the drug war: Local officials who abandoned their posts; families preyed upon by both the cartel and their own neighbors; cartel operatives who cooperated with the DEA and saw their friends and families slaughtered; the U.S. prosecutor who oversaw the case; and the DEA agent who led the investigation and who, like most people in this story, has family ties on both sides of the border.

When pressed about his role, the agent, Richard Martinez slumped in his chair, his eyes welling with tears. “How did I feel about the information being compromised? I’d rather not say, to be honest with you. I’d kind of like to leave it at that. I’d rather not say.”

EDWARD R GARCIA

 


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