Watch: Keanu Reeves’s hardcore gun and martial arts training for ‘John Wick 2’

KEANU REEVES REALLY GOT INTO CHARACTER TO PLAY AN EXPERT ASSASSIN IN JOHN WICK 2

The former Men’s Fitness cover star went through an extensive training period for the film, working on a tactical gun range with actual weapons, doing fight choreography with the stunt coordinator, and even getting behind the wheel to get comfortable with the film’s (many) driving stunts.

Reeves is not stranger to working hard on his training for film roles: Back when Reeves portrayed Neo in the Matrix trilogy, he went through months of martial arts training to prepare for that film’s extensive stunt work.

Reeves likely will be getting ready to do it all over again soon, as John Wick 3 appears to be on the fast track to production. Chad Stahelski, director of the second film, told Collider that the story is in the works, and The Hollywood Reporter confirmed that Derek Kolstad, who wrote the first two films, is back for the third installment.

Stahelski later gave another update to the Independent, saying that the third film could be a “completion” of Wick’s story and that the story will dive more into Wick’s backstory: “We are going to put in something about the High Table, how that all works,” Stahelski said. “We’re going to put in something about where John comes from, and where he wants to go. I don’t want to say too much more, but it will be a nice completion to Mr. Wick’s journey.” (Could that mean thatJohn Wick 3 will be the final film in the series? Time will tell, but it’s not likely as long as the reviews and box office scores are so good.)

Here’s a look at Reeves working on fight training for the film:

Reeves takes on tactical training for the movie in these two videos:

 

Want to get ripped and ready for battle like

 

Martial artists win big in tournament

 

FAIRFIELD TWP. – Peyton Cifelli, a Adlai Stevenson School in Fairfield first grader, has won First Place in the Future Kick Youth Martial Arts competition on Sunday, May 21.

“Peyton is a fierce, little girl. She meets every expectation with determination and focus,” said Instructor Peaches Vizzio. “She is going to be one very special martial artist.”

After competing in the Twin Towers tournament last year and coming home empty handed, Peyton trained harder than ever and performed her traditional Kung-Fu form against over 40 other competitors, Vizzio said. Her division was made up of over forty 6-7 year old beginner boys and girls from many different martial arts backgrounds including Korean Tae Kwon Do, Japanese Karate and Chinese Kung-Fu. Students from all over the tri-state area represented their styles in this tournament.

“She practiced a lot and even though I have no clue what she is doing, Peyton practiced by performing her form for me over and over,” mother Tricia Cifelli said. “She did awesome. I am very proud of her.”

Also competing was Isaac Rodriguez, a Grandview Elementary School in North Caldwell 3rd grader, won third place in forms in the Future Kick Youth Martial Arts.

“Isaac is such a pleasure to have in class. He is always eager to please. He makes us all smile with his silliness,” Vizzio said. “I am so happy that his hard work is starting to come to fruition.”

After competing in a few tournaments and coming home empty handed, Isaac was a little nervous about this competition, Vizzio said. He performed his traditional Kung-Fu form against over 40 other competitors. His division was made up of over forty 8-9 year old beginner boys and girls from many different martial arts backgrounds including Korean Tae Kwon Do, Japanese Karate and Chinese Kung-Fu. Students from all over the tri-state area represented their styles in this tournament.

Vizzio’s Institute of Martial Arts brought fourteen competitors to compete in the Future Kick Youth Tournament. Overall, Vizzio’s students took home six first place trophies, three second place trophies and three third place trophies. Four students also competed for Grand Champion.

 

EDWARD R GARICA

 

 

 

 

Mississippi martial artist has eye on Tokyo Olympics

(Photo: Benjamen Sanford/Hattiesburg American)

Olympic gold is on the mind of a 23-year-old martial arts instructor.

With the 2020 Summer Olympics including karate for the first time, Ian Turner has the opportunity to join the first U.S. karate team, along with four of his students.

Ian, from the small town of Bailey, was selected to compete at the World Martial Arts Games for the United States Martial Arts Team in September. Participants at the competition will be chosen to represent the U.S. at the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

Ian, who graduated from William Carey University majoring in speech and social science, began training in karate at seven years old.

Martial arts inundated the pop culture of the ’80s and ’90s, with films like “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “Karate Kid” and movies featuring Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris. Ian laughed as he admitted that such movies made him interested in martial arts, and that he initially “just wanted to beat somebody up.”

His mentality quickly changed when he realized the intensity and beauty of martial arts at his first lesson. For the first seven years of his career, Ian trained for four to six hours a day for five days a week, taking four different classes a day.

As Ian’s love for martial arts grew, his family quickly joined him. His father, Kenneth, and younger sister, Brittany, began taking lessons. The two other Turner sisters, Kenna, 12, and Elise, 6, also take martial arts. Their mother, Sheila, does not practice but supports her husband and children at events and encourages them to master their forms.

Kenneth said martial arts became a “centerpiece” to the Turner family. They went to competitions together, trained together and Ian said they are each other’s “biggest competition.”

Brittany, 19, who started training at age 3, said she had never known anything other than martial arts.

“It’s the normal thing for our family; we are all close today because of it,” Brittany said.

At the age of 16, what Ian intended to be a small seminar to instruct other children in martial arts turned into him opening his own dojo. Turner Shotokan, in Collinsville, is run by the family with Kenneth, Ian and Brittany instructing.

“We do everything as a family,” Ian said.

At Turner Shotokan, Ian said they concentrate on teaching martial arts in an applicable way to students ranging from 6 to 40.

“I want to make sure my students get a good workout and are actually learning and are using what they learn so that they can defend themselves if needed,” Ian said.

On Feb. 25, wearing jeans and flip-flops, Ian and Brittany went to coach and encourage their trainees competing in U.S. Martial Arts Team tryouts. Next thing they knew, Ian and Brittany were given gis and convinced to try out.

“The game had changed,” Ian said.

Ten hours later, the duo were informed they had made the team, along with their trainees Thad and Logan Davis and Aaron Rhodes. Neither Turner sibling had trained for the tryouts because they were concentrating on helping their students make the team.

As part of the U.S. Martial Arts Team, Ian will participate in the World Martial Arts Games in September, along with his sisters and trainees. Ian spoke with humility and awe as he expressed the honor he felt as an athlete representing the U.S.

“It hits me every time I think about it like it’s the first time I heard the news. I am a United States athlete. I will be wearing the flag. Holy crap.”

Ian’s training for the World Martial Arts Games in Orlando consists of a strict diet and daily workouts lasting about five hours. He said this competition was the “biggest thing” he has ever done and he wants to be the best he can be.

Ian was chosen to participate in traditional kata, sparring, point fighting and continuous fighting at the games. Brittany will participate in Chinese weapons, point sparring, continuous sparring, jiu-jitsu and grapple strike.

“Martial arts isn’t just something physical, it is something mental as well,” Ian said. “Your body is only as strong as your mind will let it be. If you stop the second your body tells you, ‘This hurts,’ you will never get stronger physically.”

In the midst of his rigorous training, Ian holds on to what his father, Kenneth, has told him since he was a child: “Sacrifice a little now for a lot later.”

Ian is focused on winning gold at the World Martial Arts Games in the hopes of proceeding to Tokyo for the 2020 Olympics.

To compete in the World Martial Arts Games, the five Mississippi athletes are raising $4,000 for tournament and travel expenses. Those interested in sponsoring may contact Ian at ianturner15@yahoo.com.

Get moving with ancient Chinese martial art classes in Diggle

DISCOVER THE secrets of an ancient Chinese Martial Art right here in Saddleworth.

Tai Chi and Qigong classes are now open in Diggle and are held every Tuesday from 7.30pm to 8.30pm and on Fridays from 10.45am to 11.45am at Kilngreen Hall.

Katja Londa, a qualified Level 3 instructor, who runs the classes, first started Tai Chi 15 years ago after her first son was born.

A friend took her along to a class and she immediately took to the sport and has never looked back since.

Katja explained her favourite part of the classes is the calming effect it has on her and others in the midst of everyone’s stressful lives.

She added: “Everyone should give Tai Chi a chance as it is a sport for everyone, old and young. It’s a great way to get moving and unwind at the same time.

“The graceful, slow, circular movements require you to focus solely on what the body is doing in the present moment.

“Your mind slows down. You forget the stress you’ve just had at work or elsewhere.

“Tai Chi has been called ‘meditation in motion’ and that is exactly what it is for me. Switching off, while doing beautiful, flowing movements that have been done by generations of people for centuries.

“My classes have a friendly and relaxed atmosphere where I focus on each individual.”

The ancient Chinese Martial Art is used to help relax the mind and body, relieve stress, and improve posture, balance and coordination.

Tai Chi is also known to strengthen your immune system and is recommended by doctors to prevent falls.

Katja added: “It has been shown to be beneficial as an adjunct therapy for many, many health conditions including: arthritis, fall prevention, stress, cardiovascular disease, problems with the digestive system and impaired immune system.

“For this reason Tai Chi is now also being called ‘medication in motion’!”

New people are always welcome to Katja’s sessions and are encouraged to just turn up wearing comfortable clothes and shoes, with classes costing £4.50 each, and just £2.50 for your first class.

EDWARD R GARCIA